very

[[t]ve̱ri[/t]]
1) ADV: ADV adj/adv (emphasis) Very is used to give emphasis to an adjective or adverb.

The problem and the answer are very simple...

It is very, very strong evidence indeed...

I'm very sorry...

They are getting the hang of it very quickly...

Thank you very much...

The men were very much like my father.

2) PHRASE: usu PHR adj/adv Not very is used with an adjective or adverb to say that something is not at all true, or that it is true only to a small degree.

She's not very impressed with them...

I'm not very good at explaining myself...

It's obviously not used very much...

`How well do you know her?' - `Not very.'

3) ADV: ADV adj (emphasis) You use very to give emphasis to an adjective that is not usually graded, when you want to say that a quality is very obvious.

Janet looked very pregnant...

His taste strikes the English as very French...

If you think I'm happy with what's left, you're very wrong.

4) ADV: ADV superl (emphasis) You use very to give emphasis to a superlative adjective or adverb. For example, if you say that something is the very best, you are emphasizing that it is the best.

They will be helped by the very latest in navigation aids...

I am feeling in the very best of spirits...

At the very least, the Government must offer some protection to mothers who fear domestic violence.

5) ADJ: ADJ n (emphasis) You use very with certain nouns in order to specify an extreme position or extreme point in time.

At the very back of the yard, several feet from Lenny, was a wooden shack...

I turned to the very end of the book, to read the final words...

The opening of a Euro-Disneyland in the very heart of France is a potent symbol...

He was wrong from the very beginning...

We still do not have enough women at the very top.

6) ADJ: ADJ n (emphasis) You use very with nouns to emphasize that something is exactly the right one or exactly the same one.

Everybody says he is the very man for the case...

She died in this very house...

In my view, it only perpetuates the very problem that it sets out to cure...

`Most secret', he called it. Those were his very words.

Syn:
7) ADJ: ADJ n (emphasis) You use very with nouns to emphasize the importance or seriousness of what you are saying.

At one stage his very life was in danger...

The very basis of Indian politics has been transformed...

Mr Campbell said such programmes were by their very nature harmful...

History is taking place before your very eyes.

8) CONVENTION (formulae) Very good is used to tell someone in authority that you agree to carry out a suggestion or order. [FORMAL]

`Now give me some account of your voyage.' - `Very good, sir.'

Syn:
9) PHRASE: PHR as reply, cl PHR (emphasis) The expression very much so is an emphatic way of answering `yes' to something or saying that it is true or correct.

`Are you enjoying your holiday?' - `Very much so.'

10) CONVENTION (formulae) Very well is used to say that you agree to do something or you accept someone's answer, even though you might not be completely satisfied with it.

`We need proof, sir.' Another pause. Then, `Very well.'...

Very well, please yourself.

Syn:
11) PHRASE: V inflects, PHR inf If you say that you cannot very well do something, you mean that it would not be right or possible to do it.

He couldn't very well go to her office and force her to write a check...

I said yes. I can't very well say no.

Syn:
can hardly

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Very — Ver y, a. [Compar. {Verier}; superl. {Veriest}.] [OE. verai, verray, OF. verai, vrai, F. vrai, (assumed) LL. veracus, for L. verax true, veracious, fr. verus true; akin to OHG. & OS. w[=a]r, G. wahr, D. waar; perhaps originally, that is or exists …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very — may refer to: * Very, an English adverb, expression of comparative degree. *Very (album) by the Pet Shop Boys *Very (lunar crater) *Very (crater on Mars)People with the surname Very: *Jones Very, poet *Frank Washington Very, astronomer …   Wikipedia

  • Very — Ver y, adv. In a high degree; to no small extent; exceedingly; excessively; extremely; as, a very great mountain; a very bright sum; a very cold day; the river flows very rapidly; he was very much hurt. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • very — I. adjective (verier; est) Etymology: Middle English verray, verry, from Anglo French verai, from Vulgar Latin *veracus, alteration of Latin verac , verax truthful, from verus true; akin to Old English wǣr true, Old High German wāra trust, care,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Very special episode — is an advertising term originally used in American television commercials to refer to an episode of a situation comedy or television drama that deals with a serious or controversial social issue. Although the concept has been in existence for… …   Wikipedia

  • Very Reverend — Very Ver y, a. [Compar. {Verier}; superl. {Veriest}.] [OE. verai, verray, OF. verai, vrai, F. vrai, (assumed) LL. veracus, for L. verax true, veracious, fr. verus true; akin to OHG. & OS. w[=a]r, G. wahr, D. waar; perhaps originally, that is or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very Long Baseline Interferometry — (VLBI) is a type of astronomical interferometry used in radio astronomy. It allows observations of an object that are made simultaneously by many telescopes to be combined, emulating a telescope with a size equal to the maximum separation between …   Wikipedia

  • Very low frequency — or VLF refers to radio frequencies (RF) in the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz. Since there is not much bandwidth in this band of the radio spectrum, only the very simplest signals are used, such as for radio navigation. Also known as the myriameter… …   Wikipedia

  • Very night signals — Very s night signals Ver y s night signals, or Very night signals Ver y night signals . [After Lieut. Samuel W. Very, who invented the system in 1877.] (Naut.) A system of signaling in which balls of red and green fire are fired from a pistol,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very pistol — Very s night signals Ver y s night signals, or Very night signals Ver y night signals . [After Lieut. Samuel W. Very, who invented the system in 1877.] (Naut.) A system of signaling in which balls of red and green fire are fired from a pistol,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very's night signals — Ver y s night signals, or Very night signals Ver y night signals . [After Lieut. Samuel W. Very, who invented the system in 1877.] (Naut.) A system of signaling in which balls of red and green fire are fired from a pistol, the arrangement in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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